AI Chatbots in Peril as Users Claim Data Copyright

Copyright issues arise when AI chatbots replicate the works of poets, painters, and other creatives.

Source: coingape


STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    In its mission to become the most disruptive technology force since the invention of the internet, ChatGPT uses AI chatbots.
    News outlets, authors, music publishers, and other companies whose copyrighted materials were used to train the massive language models of the chatbots are want a share of the profits.
    The Bloomberg story is released at the same time as The New York Times filed a copyright infringement action against Microsoft and OpenAI.

     

    AI chatbots that replicate the works of poets, painters, and other creatives are running into copyright problems with them. According to a Bloomberg report, generative artificial intelligence systems such as ChatGPT, which aspire to be the most disruptive technological force since the internet's inception, have ingested a vast amount of material, including millions of songs, beat poetry, draft contracts, movie scripts, photo essays, and novels from the 19th century.

    AI Chatbots Run Into Issues


    According to Bloomberg, the writings, images, and sounds produced by ChatGPT and other AI chatbots may match those of a talented person. However, this is accomplished by taking previously generated data, analyzing it for patterns, and then applying those patterns to the creation of fresh material.

    These generative artificial intelligence systems have ingested millions of songs, beat poetry, draft contracts, movie scripts, photo essays, and books from the 19th century in their drive to become the most disruptive technological force since the internet's founding.

    It seems that this thorough investigation of human history comes at a price. News outlets, authors, music publishers, and other companies whose copyrighted works were used to train the chatbots' massive language models are want a share of the profits.


    An AI Chatbot's Prior Issues


    The Bloomberg story is released at the same time as The New York Times filed a copyright infringement action against Microsoft and OpenAI. In the case, the NYT claims that the businesses who created ChatGPT and other well-known AI systems have improperly used its literary works.

    The action, which was filed with the Federal District Court in Manhattan, claims that automated chatbots that were trained on millions of The Times stories are now directly competing with the news organization as trustworthy sources of information.

    So far, the lawsuit involving OpenAI and the New York Times has shed light on a major area. Is artificial intelligence a reliable source of data? The main duty of a news company is to make sure that the information it reports comes from reliable sources. However, if AI tools and bots are increasingly trying to imitate news institutions, are they getting their information from trustworthy sources?

    The case also brought up the topic of using data rather than replicating it. A number of copyright holders, including The Times, are suing tech firms for allegedly using their works for AI training. Publishers of music, associations of authors, and visual artists are among the other copyright holders. Tech giants, on the other hand, argue that the lawsuits threaten the multitrillion-dollar future expansion of the industry.

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